Archive for February, 2009

Mark Your Calendars for A Look At Detective Fiction

Friday, February 27th, 2009

Mystery and police procedural fans mark your calendars now for a fun and revealing progam at the Abingdon branch! It’s called, “A Look at Detective Fiction.” You will review all types of detective fiction, including the classic detective story, the ‘cozy’ mystery, the hard-boiled detective, the emergence of women as private eyes, and much more. Door prizes included!

Age Group – Adult to Middle and High school

Age/Grade – Adult
Event Type – Library Event

Branch -Abingdon

Day of the week – Monday

Event Date – Mar 30

Time – 6:30 PM to 7:30 PM

Contact # – 410-638-3990
Registration required and begins 2 weeks prior to all program/class dates. Please Call 410-638-3990

More Readers’ Reviews from the Winter Reading Program

Friday, February 27th, 2009

Blackwood Farm by Anne Rice Find this book in our catalog

“I enjoyed this as a “book on tape” and I believe the narrator added considerably to the enjoyment of the book. Find this audiobook in our catalog . It presented a whole different perspective on the Vampire. It also provided an insightful look into the ways of the South. 5 stars!”
submitted by a Winter Reader

More Readers’ Reviews from the Winter Reading Program

Friday, February 27th, 2009

Grown Up Digital: how the net generation is changing your world by Don Tapscott Find this book in our catalog

“Ever read Arthur C. Clark’s short story, “Childhood’s End?” Here is the modern version of how people under the age of 32 actually think differently and communicate differently from those older. These are the people who elected Barack Obama and didn’t “campaign” for him (used the Internet & blogged for him). These are the people who don’t recognize borders; who speak to equals who live overseas. Read this and accept your place with them or as a dinosaur.”
submitted by a Winter Reader

More Readers’ Reviews from the Winter Reading Program

Thursday, February 26th, 2009

The Lucky One by Nicholas Sparks Find this book in our catalog

“Another very good book by Mr. Sparks. This would also make a great movie! He keeps you guessing – you never quite know what is going to happen. I liked the story, the action, the romance – I liked all of it! I hope Mr. Sparks never stops writing books!”
submitted by a Winter Reader

More Readers’ Reviews from the Winter Reading Program

Thursday, February 26th, 2009

At Home in Mitford by Jan Karon Find this book in our catalog

At Home in Mitford is a beautifully written story, filled with interesting and memorable characters, and set in a small mountain town. The main character, [Father Tim] is a 60-year-old Episcopalian priest whose faith is not a coat he wears, it’s deep inside him. That doesn’t make him free from problems, nor does he have easy answers. Following him as he deals with problems big and small makes for engrossing reading. I came away from the story with a warm glow and happy feelings.”
submitted by a Winter Reader

More Readers’ Reviews from the Winter Reading Program

Wednesday, February 25th, 2009

S Is For Silence by Sue Grafton Find this book in our catalog

“S is for Silence – Grafton’s best. Could not put it down, but was sad after I finished reading it. It kept me guessing all the way. Missing 24-year-old woman – dead or alive. Gone she was since 1953, along with a new 1953 Chevy Bel Air. Thirty-four years later, the woman’s daughter hires Grafton’s female detective to give her some answers. Various chapters flash back to 1953 and many people in the missing woman’s life are fleshed out and their relationships with her described. The other chapters come back to the present time of 1987 and where these characters [are] that were so close to the missing woman. Back in 1953, so many people kept quiet about little secrets and what they knew about the missing woman, but 34 years later these same people have dropped their guard and bits and pieces come spilling out and it is up to the female detective to connect them together.”

submitted by a Winter Reader

More Readers’ Reviews from the Winter Reading Program

Wednesday, February 25th, 2009

This Year I Will… by M. J. Ryan (Find this book in our catalog)

Could you find a more glowing recommendation than this one a reader wrote on her Winter Reading book log?

“This book is for anyone who has made resolutions or promises to his- or her-self & not kept them. Ms. Ryan gives a new approach, a new way of looking at the problem.
I have “known’ the right thing to do about my weight & health but could not stick to the “right decisions.” This book has changed that for me & for the first time I am sticking to an exercise program – not just starting one.
I have recommended this book to several people & it has had a big impact on them as well.
Excellent book!. If you only read one book this is the one to choose.”

Women’s History Month is March

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

I received this message from the Maryland Women’s Heritage Center: “Did you know that the first officicial national commemoration of women’s history in the United States was established in March 1980 when Congress passed a resolution making Women’s History Week a designated celebration? Maryland also began its statewide Women’s History Week commemorations in 1980, coordinated by the Maryland Commission for Women and the Maryland State Department of Education. Congress expanded its resolution in 1987 creating the first Women’s History Month, which has been celebrated in Maryland since that time. Celebrate the outstanding contributions and accomplishments of historical and contemporary women who came before us and their extraordinary accomplishments during Women’s History Month in March and All Year Long!”

For 2009, the national theme for Women’s History Month is “Women Taking the Lead to Save Our Planet.”

I will be posting booklists on Readers Place throughout March on women taking the lead in many roles.

More Readers’ Reviews from the Winter Reading Program

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

Here are some more readers’ recommendations from recently completed Winter reading book logs:
  • Gone by Michael Grant written for teens, very interesting premise; all adults (anyone over 14) disappears from the community which then becomes enclosed in a glass bubble. Remember Lord of the Flies (William Golding).”
  • Complete Guide to Investing During Retirement by Thomas Maskell ; entertaining as well as educational; basic sound investment advice presented as a “game”. Motivational and comforting.”
  • The Gate House by Nelson DeMille is a wonderful book for those who are or have been married. The author keeps you in suspense and sprinkles it with humor.”
  • Snow Flower and the Secret Fan [by Lisa See] is a fascinating story of 2 women in China in the early 1800s. There is a very informative and interesting discussion about the Chinese practice of foot binding.”
  • The Boy in the Striped Pajamas [by John Boyne] is a really great book for someone who is intersted in stories of the Holocaust. This book is from a 9 year old boy’s point of view.”
  • Until We Reach Home by Lynn Austin – ” Great Story about sisters and the wonderful love they share. They fight but they always forgive because their love for each other overcomes all.”
  • Black Ops – “[W. E. B.] Griffin: one of the greatest storytellers of our time. Good book.”
  • The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larrson – ” This will be my first nomination for my own book of the year 2009 contest.”
  • Bright Eyes [by Catherine Anderson] is a good romance story and has some suspense & mystery woven in, of course there’s a happy ending too!”
  • Every Now and Then by Karen Kingsbury – “This book was another of her wonderful works. The Boxter series are also great escapes from the everyday chores of life.”
  • Wishful Drinking by Carrie Fisher – ” Interesting, revealing account of Ms. Fisher re-acquainting herself with her own life experiences and relationships after having electro-shock therapy.”

Movies based on books do well at last night’s Oscars

Monday, February 23rd, 2009

One movie based on a book did superbly, and a few other movies based on books did well at the Oscars last night, Sunday, February 22. Slumdog Millionaire won eight Oscars in a range of categories: best picture, directing, adapted screenplay, original score, film editing, original song, sound mixing and cinematography.
The film is based on the novel Q&A; by Vikas Swarup. Find this book in our catalog.
In other awards for movies based on books, and on a short story:
Kate Winslet won best actress for her role in The Reader, based on the book of the same name by Bernhard Schlink, translated by Carol Brown Janeway. Find this book in our catalog.
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, based on a short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald, won best art direction, makeup and visual effects.