Archive for the ‘Award-winning Books’ Category

Ben Franklin Awards

Wednesday, June 4th, 2014

The Independent Book Publishers Association presented the Ben Franklin Awards at a gala ceremony May 28 in New York City. For a

complete list of Gold and Silver winners, click here.

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Nebula Awards for Science Fiction

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

The winners of the Nebula Awards for 2013 science fiction were announced May 18, 2014.  Winner of the award for best novel is:

Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie (Find in our catalog)

This is what it says in the catalog:

“On a remote, icy planet, the soldier known as Breq is drawing closer to completing her quest. Breq is both more than she seems and less than she was. Years ago, she was the Justice of Toren, a colossal starship with an artificial intelligence linking thousands of corpse soldiers in the service of the Radch, the empire that conquered the galaxy. An act of treachery has ripped it all away, leaving her with only one fragile human body. And only one purpose–to revenge herself on Anaander Mianaai, many-bodied, near-immortal Lord of the Radch.”

Read an excerpt and see reviews in our catalog.

Editor

Winning Book on a Medical Theme

Monday, May 19th, 2014

Andrew Solomon’s Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity has just won the Wellcome Book Prize for a title on a medical theme. Chair of judges Andrew Motion said the book has “already been widely praised but I hope this lifts it to another level. Anyone who has ever had anything to do with a family should read it–and that’s everybody,” the Guardian reported.

Click here to go straight to our catalog. Here is what it says in our catalog about the book:

“From the National Book Award–winning author of The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression comes a monumental new work, a decade in the writing, about family. In Far from the Tree, Andrew Solomon tells the stories of parents who not only learn to deal with their exceptional children but also find profound meaning in doing so.

Solomon’s startling proposition is that diversity is what unites us all. He writes about families coping with deafness, dwarfism, Down syndrome, autism, schizophrenia, multiple severe disabilities, with children who are prodigies, who are conceived in rape, who become criminals, who are transgender. While each of these characteristics is potentially isolating, the experience of difference within families is universal, as are the triumphs of love Solomon documents in every chapter.

All parenting turns on a crucial question: to what extent parents should accept their children for who they are, and to what extent they should help them become their best selves. Drawing on forty thousand pages of interview transcripts with more than three hundred families, Solomon mines the eloquence of ordinary people facing extreme challenges. Whether considering prenatal screening for genetic disorders, cochlear implants for the deaf, or gender reassignment surgery for transgender people, Solomon narrates a universal struggle toward compassion. Many families grow closer through caring for a challenging child; most discover supportive communities of others similarly affected; some are inspired to become advocates and activists, celebrating the very conditions they once feared. Woven into their courageous and affirming stories is Solomon’s journey to accepting his own identity, which culminated in his midlife decision, influenced by this research, to become a parent.

Elegantly reported by a spectacularly original thinker, Far from the Tree explores themes of generosity, acceptance, and tolerance—all rooted in the insight that love can transcend every prejudice. This crucial and revelatory book expands our definition of what it is to be human.” (Simon and Schuster)

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2014 Pulitzer Prizes for Achievements in Literature

Monday, May 5th, 2014

The Pulitzer Prizes are awarded annually for achievements in journalism, literature, drama and music.  These 2014 prize winners, announced April 14,  in Fiction, Biography, History, General Nonfiction and Poetry are available in our catalog.  Click on a link to go straight there.

Fiction: The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt (find this book in our catalog)

 

 

 

Biography or Autobiography: Margaret Fuller: A New American Life by Megan Marshall (find this book in our catalog)

 

 

 

Nonfiction: Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation by Dan Fagin (find this book in our catalog)

 

 

 

History: The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832 by Alan Taylor (find this book in our catalog)

 

 

 

Poetry: 3 Sections by Vijay Seshadri (find this book in our catalog)

 

 

 

Editor

Best Science Fiction

Friday, May 2nd, 2014

The 2014 Hugo Awards for science fiction will be announced August 17.  The list of finalists was announced at the 2014 Worldcon, on April 19, 2014.

Here is a selection of finalists.  Just click on a title to go straight to the catalog and place a hold.

Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie. “On a remote, icy planet, the soldier known as Breq is drawing closer to completing her quest. Breq is both more than she seems and less than she was. Years ago, she was the Justice of Toren, a colossal starship with an artificial intelligence linking thousands of corpse soldiers in the service of the Radch, the empire that conquered the galaxy. An act of treachery has ripped it all away, leaving her with only one fragile human body. And only one purpose–to revenge herself on Anaander Mianaai, many-bodied, near-immortal Lord of the Radch.”

Neptune’s Brood by Charles Stross. “The year is AD 7000. The human species is extinct – for the fourth time – due to its fragile nature.

Krina Alizond-114 is metahuman, descended from the robots that once served humanity. She’s on a journey to the water-world of Shin-Tethys to find her sister Ana. But her trip is interrupted when pirates capture her ship. Their leader, the enigmatic Count Rudi, suspects that there’s more to Krina’s search than meets the eye.

He’s correct: Krina and Ana each possess half of the fabled Atlantis Carnet, a lost financial instrument of unbelievable value?capable of bringing down entire civilizations. Krina doesn’t know that Count Rudi suspects her motives, so she accepts his offer to get her to Shin-Tethys in exchange for an introduction to Ana.

And what neither of them suspects is that a ruthless body-double assassin has stalked Krina across the galaxy, ready to take the Carnet once it is whole – and leave no witnesses alive to tell the tale.” (Penguin Putnam)

Parasite by Mira Grant. “We owe our good health to a humble parasite — a genetically engineered tapeworm developed by the pioneering SymboGen Corporation. When implanted, the Intestinal Bodyguard worm protects us from illness, boosts our immune system — even secretes designer drugs. It’s been successful beyond the scientists’ wildest dreams. Now, years on, almost every human being has a SymboGen tapeworm living within them.

But these parasites are getting restless. They want their own lives . . . and will do anything to get them.” (Grand Central Pub)

Editor

PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction

Monday, April 28th, 2014

Karen Joy Fowler won the $15,000 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction for her novel We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves (find this book in our catalog). She will be honored May 10 during the annual PEN/Faulkner award ceremony at the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Here is what it says about the book in our catalog: “Named a Best of 2013 pick by: The New York Times Book Review, Slate, Newsday, Chicago Tribune, San Jose Mercury News, The Christian Science Monitor, Library Journal, and BookPage

“I thought this was a gripping, big-hearted book . . . through the tender voice of her protagonist, Fowler has a lot to say about family, memory, language, science, and indeed the question of what constitutes a human being.”–Khaled Hosseini

“From the New York Times bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club, the story of an American family, middle class in middle America, ordinary in every way but one. But that exception is the beating heart of this extraordinary novel.

Meet the Cooke family: Mother and Dad, brother Lowell, sister Fern, and our narrator, Rosemary, who begins her story in the middle. She has her reasons. “I spent the first eighteen years of my life defined by this one fact: that I was raised with a chimpanzee,” she tells us. “It’s never going to be the first thing I share with someone. I tell you Fern was a chimp and already you aren’t thinking of her as my sister. But until Fern’s expulsion, I’d scarcely known a moment alone. She was my twin, my funhouse mirror, my whirlwind other half, and I loved her as a sister.”

Rosemary was not yet six when Fern was removed. Over the years, she’s managed to block a lot of memories. She’s smart, vulnerable, innocent, and culpable. With some guile, she guides us through the darkness, penetrating secrets and unearthing memories, leading us deeper into the mystery she has dangled before us from the start. Stripping off the protective masks that have hidden truths too painful to acknowledge, in the end, “Rosemary” truly is for remembrance.”  (Penguin Putnam)

We also have this book in audiobook and ebook formats.

Editor

National Book Critics Circle Awards

Friday, April 4th, 2014

March 13, 2014 the National Book Critics Circle announced its Award Winners for Publishing Year 2013.

The annual National Book Critics Circle awards are the only literature honors given out by book reviewers and critics.  Click on a highlighted title to go straight to our catalog.

Biography – Jonathan Swift: His Life and His World, by Leo Damrosch.

“Jonathan Swift is best remembered today as the author of Gulliver’s Travels, the satiric fantasy that quickly became a classic and has remained in print for nearly three centuries. Yet Swift also wrote many other influential works, was a major political and religious figure in his time, and became a national hero, beloved for his fierce protest against English exploitation of his native Ireland. What is really known today about the enigmatic man behind these accomplishments? Can the facts of his life be separated from the fictions?

In this deeply researched biography, Leo Damrosch draws on discoveries made over the past thirty years to tell the story of Swift’s life anew. Probing holes in the existing evidence, he takes seriously some daring speculations about Swift’s parentage, love life, and various personal relationships and shows how Swift’s public version of his life—the one accepted until recently—was deliberately misleading. Swift concealed aspects of himself and his relationships, and other people in his life helped to keep his secrets.

Assembling suggestive clues, Damrosch re-narrates the events of Swift’s life while making vivid the sights, sounds, and smells of his English and Irish surroundings. Through his own words and those of a wide circle of friends, a complex Swift emerges: a restless, combative, empathetic figure, a man of biting wit and powerful mind, and a major figure in the history of world letters.” (Yale University)

Fiction – Americanah, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichi.

“As teenagers in a Lagos secondary school, Ifemelu and Obinze fall in love. Their Nigeria is under military dictatorship, and people are leaving the country if they can. Ifemelu—beautiful, self-assured—departs for America to study. She suffers defeats and triumphs, finds and loses relationships and friendships, all the while feeling the weight of something she never thought of back home: race. Obinze—the quiet, thoughtful son of a professor—had hoped to join her, but post-9/11 America will not let him in, and he plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London.

Years later, Obinze is a wealthy man in a newly democratic Nigeria, while Ifemelu has achieved success as a writer of an eye-opening blog about race in America. But when Ifemelu returns to Nigeria, and she and Obinze reignite their shared passion—for their homeland and for each other—they will face the toughest decisions of their lives.

Fearless, gripping, at once darkly funny and tender, spanning three continents and numerous lives, Americanah is a richly told story set in today’s globalized world: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s most powerful and astonishing novel yet.” (Random House, Inc.)

General Nonfiction – Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital, by Sheri Fink.

“Pulitzer Prize winner Sheri Fink’s landmark investigation of patient deaths at a New Orleans hospital ravaged by Hurricane Katrina — and her suspenseful portrayal of the quest for truth and justice. After Katrina struck and the floodwaters rose, the power failed, and the heat climbed, exhausted caregivers chose to designate certain patients last for rescue. Months later, several health professionals faced criminal allegations that they deliberately injected numerous patients with drugs to hasten their deaths. Five Days at Memorial, the culmination of six years of reporting, unspools the mystery of what happened in those days, bringing the reader into a hospital fighting for its life and into a conversation about the most terrifying form of health care rationing. In a voice at once involving and fair, masterful and intimate, Fink exposes the hidden dilemmas of end-of-life care and reveals just how ill-prepared we are in America for the impact of large-scale disasters–and how we can do better. A remarkable book, engrossing from start to finish, Five Days at Memorial radically transforms your understanding of human nature in crisis.” (Amazon.com)

Poetry – Metaphysical Dog : Poems, by Frank Bidart.

“In “Those Nights,” Frank Bidart writes: “We who could get / somewhere through / words through / sex could not.” Words and sex, art and flesh: In Metaphysical Dog, Bidart explores their nexus. The result stands among this deeply adventurous poet’s most powerful and achieved work, an emotionally naked, fearlessly candid journey through many of the central axes, the central conflicts, of his life, and ours.

Near the end of the book, Bidart writes:

In adolescence, you thought your work

ancient work: to decipher at last

human beings’ relation to God. Decipher

love. To make what was once whole

whole again: or to see

why it never should have been thought whole.

This “ancient work” reflects what the poet sees as fundamental in human feeling, what psychologists and mystics have called the “hunger for the Absolute”—a hunger as fundamental as any physical hunger. This hunger must confront the elusiveness of the Absolute, our self-deluding, failed glimpses of it. The third section of the book is titled “History is a series of failed revelations.”

The result is one of the most fascinating and ambitious books of poetry in many years.”

John Leonard Prize – A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, Anthony Marra.

“Two doctors risk everything to save the life of a hunted child in this majestic debut about love, loss, and the unexpected ties that bind us together. “On the morning after the Feds burned down her house and took her father, Havaa woke from dreams of sea anemones.” Havaa, eight years old, hides in the woods and watches the blaze until her neighbor, Akhmed, discovers her sitting in the snow. Akhmed knows getting involved means risking his life, and there is no safe place to hide a child in a village where informers will do anything for a loaf of bread, but for reasons of his own, he sneaks her through the forest to the one place he thinks she might be safe: an abandoned hospital where the sole remaining doctor, Sonja Rabina, treats the wounded. Though Sonja protests that her hospital is not an orphanage, Akhmed convinces her to keep Havaa for a trial, and over the course of five extraordinary days, Sonja’s world will shift on its axis and reveal the intricate pattern of connections that weaves together the pasts of these three unlikely companions and unexpectedly decides their fate” (Random House, Inc.)

Editor

Military Book Award

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

Allen C. Guelzo has won the inaugural Guggenheim-Lehrman Prize in Military History, honoring “the best book in the field of military history published in English during the previous calendar year,” for Gettysburg: The Last Invasion (Find in our catalog). The award, which carries a prize of $50,000, was announced in a recent ceremony at the New-York Historical Society.

 

Chairman of the judging committee Dr. Andrew Roberts commented: “Gettysburg will stand out as a lasting and important work in the military history genre.”

Here’s what it says in our catalog about the book: ”

From the acclaimed Civil War historian, a brilliant new history—the most intimate and richly readable account we have had—of the climactic three-day battle of Gettysburg (July 1–3, 1863), which draws the reader into the heat, smoke, and grime of Gettysburg alongside the ordinary soldier, and depicts the combination of personalities and circumstances that produced the greatest battle of the Civil War, and one of the greatest in human history.

Of the half-dozen full-length histories of the battle of Gettysburg written over the last century, none dives down so closely to the experience of the individual soldier, or looks so closely at the sway of politics over military decisions, or places the battle so firmly in the context of nineteenth-century military practice. Allen C. Guelzo shows us the face, the sights, and the sounds of nineteenth-century combat: the lay of the land, the fences and the stone walls, the gunpowder clouds that hampered movement and vision; the armies that caroused, foraged, kidnapped, sang, and were so filthy they could be smelled before they could be seen; the head-swimming difficulties of marshaling massive numbers of poorly trained soldiers, plus thousands of animals and wagons, with no better means of communication than those of Caesar and Alexander.

What emerges is an untold story, from the trapped and terrified civilians in Gettysburg’s cellars to the insolent attitude of artillerymen, from the taste of gunpowder cartridges torn with the teeth to the sounds of marching columns, their tin cups clanking like an anvil chorus. Guelzo depicts the battle with unprecedented clarity, evoking a world where disoriented soldiers and officers wheel nearly blindly through woods and fields toward their clash, even as poetry and hymns spring to their minds with ease in the midst of carnage. Rebel soldiers look to march on Philadelphia and even New York, while the Union struggles to repel what will be the final invasion of the North. One hundred and fifty years later, the cornerstone battle of the Civil War comes vividly to life as a national epic, inspiring both horror and admiration.” – (Random House, Inc.)

Editor

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger (Find in our catalog) has won the 2014 Dilys Award, which honors the mystery that members of the Independent Mystery Booksellers Association  most enjoyed selling during the previous year. The announcement was made Thursday, March 20 during the Left Coast Crime 2014 conference in Monterey, Calif.

This is what it says in our catalog: “NOMINATED FOR THE 2014 EDGAR AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL

“That was it. That was all of it. A grace so ordinary there was no reason at all to remember it. Yet I have never across the forty years since it was spoken forgotten a single word.”

New Bremen, Minnesota, 1961. The Twins were playing their debut season, ice-cold root beers were selling out at the soda counter of Halderson’s Drugstore, and Hot Stuff comic books were a mainstay on every barbershop magazine rack. It was a time of innocence and hope for a country with a new, young president. But for thirteen-year-old Frank Drum it was a grim summer in which death visited frequently and assumed many forms. Accident. Nature. Suicide. Murder.

Frank begins the season preoccupied with the concerns of any teenage boy, but when tragedy unexpectedly strikes his family—which includes his Methodist minister father; his passionate, artistic mother; Juilliard-bound older sister; and wise-beyond-his-years kid brother—he finds himself thrust into an adult world full of secrets, lies, adultery, and betrayal, suddenly called upon to demonstrate a maturity and gumption beyond his years.

Told from Frank’s perspective forty years after that fateful summer, Ordinary Grace is a brilliantly moving account of a boy standing at the door of his young manhood, trying to understand a world that seems to be falling apart around him. It is an unforgettable novel about discovering the terrible price of wisdom and the enduring grace of God. – (Simon and Schuster)

Editor

RUSA Nonfiction Awards

Monday, March 10th, 2014

Here is a list of the RUSA nonfiction notable books for 2014.

Lawrence in Arabia: war, deceit, imperial folly and the making of the modern Middle East by Scott Anderson.

Year Zero: a history of 1945 by Ian Baruma.

On Paper: the everything of its two-thousand-year history by Nicholas Basbanes.

To the End of June: the intimate life of American foster care by Cris Beam.

The Boys in the Boat: [nine Americans and their epic quest for gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics] by Daniel James Brown.

Five Days at Memorial: life and death in a storm-ravaged hospital by Sheri Fink.

The Riddle of the Labyrinth: the quest to crack an ancient code by Margalit Fox.

On the Map: a mind-expanding exploration of the way the world looks by Simon Garfield.

Johnny Cash: the life by Robert Hilburn.

The Skies Belong to Us: love and terror in the golden age of hijacking by Brendan I. Koerner.

Animal Wise: the thoughts and emotions of our fellow creatures by Virginia Morrell.

Command and Control: nuclear weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the illusion of safety by Eric Schlosser.

The Faraway Nearby by Rebecca Solnit.

Editor